Hawk Mountain to Host Native Plant Sale: May 21 – 22

May 18th, 2016Press Release from Hawk Mountain Sanctuary

Spring Native Plant Sale

Saturday, May 21 from 10 am – 4 pm

Sunday, May 22 from Noon – 4 pm

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary will host its annual Native Plant Sale on Saturday, May 21 from 10 am to 4 pm and Sunday, May 22 from noon to 4 pm, rain or shine, in the Visitor Center parking area. In addition to being a great stop for the conservation-minded gardener, the event also will boast two days of garden-themed education programs, including two free lectures on Saturday and live raptor programs at 11 and 2 on both Saturday and Sunday.

Spearheaded by Hawk Mountain volunteers, the sale offers a wide selection of trees, shrubs, wildflowers, vines, ferns, and ground covers, all native to northeastern and central Pennsylvania. Admission to the sale and programs are free and all plant sales benefit Hawk Mountain conservation programs. A modest trail fee applies for those who wish to visit scenic overlooks.

The sale will feature nearly 300 species of natives all sorted by the best habitat for growth: sun or shade, and wet or dry. Volunteers gardeners also will be on hand to provide tips for selecting the right plant for your home landscape and which species work best to encourage birds, butterflies, and other wildlife. Customers may use the “plant holding area” while they explore the Sanctuary and volunteer runners will carry purchased plants to vehicles.

Director of Land and Facilities Todd Bauman will present a free talk at 1 pm on Saturday focused on managing invasive plants, and volunteer Mike Slater will present a free talk at 2 pm on how to attract pollinators to your garden. Both talks will be held in the Visitor Center gallery and require no advance registration.

“At Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, invasive plant control is a major challenge in maintaining forest health and function. This event allows us to educate others about how native habitats can benefit birds and to help our neighbors create native landscapes of their own,” says Director of Land and Facilities Todd Bauman. “The best part is that native plants look great, are low-cost, and low-maintenance,” he adds.

The 2,500-acre Hawk Mountain Sanctuary is the world’s first refuge for birds of prey and is open to the public year-round by trail-fee or membership, which in turn supports the non-profit organization’s raptor conservation mission and local-to-global research, training, and education programs. To learn more about Hawk Mountain or other programs, please call 610-756-6961 or visit www.hawkmountain.org.

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